Posted on

YOU could see your art appear in 2000 AD – enter our competition now!

Some of the biggest artists in comic books got their break at the legendary award-winning 2000 AD – and you could be joining them!

2000 AD Art Stars  gives artistic Earthlets the chance to submit pin-ups based on a classic 2000 AD character. The winner, chosen by the editorial team at 2000 AD, will be published in a future edition of the Galaxy’s Greatest Comic – AND they’ll get paid for it!

This is your chance to follow in the footsteps of some of comics’ greatest artistic talents!

Rebellion is pleased to announce the new theme for the 2000 AD Art Stars competition:

ROBO-HUNTER!

One of the all-time classics of 2000 AD, Robo-Hunter was created by writers John Wagner and Alan Grant and artist Ian Gibson.

Inspired by Humphrey Bogart’s hard-boiled detective in The Maltese Falcon, world-weary Sam Slade spends his days hunting down errant robots, all the while yearning for the good life. But instead he gets caught up in increasingly unbelievably – and hilarious – situations that threaten to overwhelm his stoicism, not helped by his companions – the idiotic kit-built robot Hoagy and the robotic cigar Stogie (a disturbing prediction of the vaping craze).

Sam’s first story, ‘Verdus’, launched a series that was irreverent, silly, and instantly popular. Gibson’s artwork, especially in the earlier stories, is a cornucopia of detail, from his brilliant robot designs to the expressiveness of his characters – all the while Sam’s gnarled, weary face goggle-eyed at the insanity of his world.

This is vintage 2000 AD – and the perfect character for would-be art droids to test their skills on for the latest 2000 AD Art Stars!

Please read all the terms and conditions before submitting your entry.

The winner of Art Stars will have their work published in an issue 2000 AD while two runners-up will receive zarjaz 2000 AD graphic novels! Check out the previous Art Stars winners Mark MontagueEv Shipard, Chris SkinnerDan Chase, Frederico ArevaloNeil McClements and Uwe De Witt!

Follow the competition as we feature selected entries on 2000 AD’s social media at:

Posted on

See the winner of the latest 2000 AD Art Stars competition!

The winner of the latest 2000 AD Art Stars competition has been announced!

It’s the competition that gives artists the chance to be published in the legendary anthology AND get paid for it – and Uwe De Witt is the latest winner!

2000 AD Art Stars winning entry by Uwe De Witt

Matt Smith, editor of 2000 AD, said: “The standard for the latest 2000 AD Art Stars competition has been unbelieveably high – it was a challenge to choose from some outstanding pieces. But in the end, Uwe’s entry felt like it reflected the strip’s rich legacy of artistic innovation. Channelling Bill Sienkiewicz with a touch of Bisley, plus plenty of references to Sláine’s history, it’s a vibrant and challenging piece of art that rewards repeated viewings. Congratulations to them, as well as runner-up entries Danny and Patrick, and thanks to everyone who entered.”

Uwe’s entry will be printed in a future issue of 2000 AD.

Uwe is joined by runner-ups Danny McMullen and Patrick David, both of whom win a bundle of 2000 AD graphic novels.

Art by Danny McMullen
Art by Patrick David

Three or four times a year, artists are asked to submit a Star Scan of their own take on one of 2000 AD‘s legendary characters – the winner not only gets their winning entry published in 2000 AD but they get paid for it too!

The theme for the latest competition was Sláine the Barbarian. He’s sliced and diced and warp-spasmed his way through history for 37 years – and he didn’t think it too many! Created by Pat Mills and Angie Kincaid in 1983, with duplicitous dwarf Ukko and his favourite weapon – a stone axe called Brainbiter – by his side Sláine is a combination of Robert E Howard’s Conan and the ancient Irish hero Cú Chulainn. Headstrong, arrogant, brash, and not afraid to chop first and ask questions later, Sláine MacRoth has become one of the mainstays of 2000 AD – helped by the incredible artists who have drawn him since his debut, such as Kincaid, Glenn Fabry, Simon Bisley, Dermot Power, Greg Staples, and Simon Davies.

The next theme of the 2000 AD Art Stars competition will be announced on Friday 16th October. The terms and conditions of entry can be found at 2000AD.com/artcomp and you can follow the competition on Facebook and Instagram.

Posted on

The new 2000 AD Art Stars theme has been announced!

Some of the biggest artists in comic books got their break at the legendary award-winning 2000 AD – and you could be joining them! 

Our art competition – 2000 AD Art Stars – is your chance to get into the pages of 2000 AD AND get paid for it!

Every three months, we’re giving artistic Earthlets the chance to submit Star Scan pin-ups based on 2000 AD characters – and the winner, chosen by the editorial team at 2000 AD, will be published in a future edition of the Galaxy’s Greatest Comic. PLUS they’ll be paid for their art!

Every quarter we announce a new theme and would-be art droids can submit their entries. Our editor will then choose their favourite image for publication. Plus, two runners-up will be chosen and receive zarjaz 2000 AD graphic novels! This is your chance to follow in the footsteps of some of comics’ greatest artistic talents and, who knows, maybe break into the industry yourself!

The theme for the next 2000 AD Art Stars competition for spring 2019 is STRONTIUM DOG! 

The deadline for entries is 9pm GMT on Friday 31st May.

Before submitting, please carefully read the terms and conditions at the official competition page.

Follow the competition as we feature selected entries on social media at:

Instagram: instagram.com/2000adartcomp
Facebook: facebook.com/2000adartcomp
Twitter: twitter.com/2000AD
Tumblr: 2000ADonline.tumblr.com

Posted on

Meet 2000 AD Art Stars winner Ev Shipard!

The 2000 AD Art Stars competition not only brings back the much-loved Star Scans to the pages of the Galaxy’s greatest comic but also gives some amazing artists their chance to break into comics!

The second 2000 AD Art Stars competition winner, with a spectacular image of Rogue Trooper in all-out action, was artist Ev Shipard.

You can see Ev’s Art Stars Rogue, in all its glory, printed in the pages of 2000 AD Prog 2120, and can find more of his work at instagram.com/evshipardart and evshipardentertainmentart.com.

If seeing the Art Stars winner this time has made you want to put ink on paper, the next topic, running until June, is the greatest of all bounty hunting sci-fi sagas, Strontium Dog.

Want to see your art in a Prog & get paid? Find out more over at 2000AD.com/artcomp.

Richard Bruton chatted to Ev about his winning entry …

Congratulations on your Art Stars win, first of all. What does getting your art into the pages of 2000 AD mean to you?

Ev Shipard: Thank you, I’m very excited about having my Rogue in print in 2000 AD. It’s a first for me and a real buzz to be part of an intellectual property that inspired me from an early age.

As for the Art Stars piece, in particular, what were your thoughts when coming to start the work? What were you trying to capture with the art and how did you, eventually, accomplish something you were happy with?

ES: I think key to making the Rogue Trooper painting work was to capture a moment from the firefight and immerse the viewer-  Imagine a frame from a film with the apocalyptic, poisoned landscape of Nu-Earth, with the Nort troops coming through the deadly fumes and the smoke. I’d usually go for a wider cinematic framing but to accomodate print I wanted to make sure it worked in the vertical format. Obviously, the figure of Rogue is the main focal point of the piece and his blue skin made a perfect contrast in my piece to the heat of the scene around him. But, around Rogue, I used many different compositional elements, the fiery embers, smoke tendrils, missile trails, to guide the viewers’ eye around the frame to, hopefully, create something of a narrative for viewers, giving them something of the wider story of the moment I’d presented.

In your Art Stars piece, you’ve kept all of the traditional elements of Rogue Trooper, but managed to pack the piece with such action and intensity. Your painted art would indicate, at least to me, some love of the great artists working in this style, the George Pratts and their like?

ES: I love a narrative piece and I love the idea of the human condition, or in this case the genetically modified human condition. It’s hard to put yourself in this character’s shoes but I wanted to immerse the viewer in this moment on the battlefield- almost a tactile, sensual quality- they can smell the fumes, the smoke and feel the burning embers. My ‘go to’ for references is generally classical fine art even when I am working on film projects. And I do love a digital piece that blurs the lines between traditional oils and Photoshop, I often bring elements or texture from my fine art pieces into my commercial work and have painted a number of pieces purely in oils or acrylic for other sci-fi properties. I am a big fan of George’s work and his impartial approach to traditional media. When it comes to the representation of war and the human condition you can’t go past Pratt’s art. Similarly, there’s an Australian war artist, Ivor Hele, whose draftsmanship and dynamism in his figure work is just incredible.

Now that you’ve had that first experience of being in the pages of a Prog, is it something you’re going to be pursuing further?

ES: I’ll do my best to get back in here!… or perhaps on a cover, is that too much to ask? 🙂

When did you first see Rogue Trooper in the pages of 2000 AD and what was the impact of the strip upon you?

ES: The first thing I remember about Rogue Trooper is that incredible Dave Gibbons’ artwork. I can’t remember the particular Prog, but that art left a great impression, as did Cam Kennedy’s work when I discovered that sometime later on. With comic books I would generally follow the artist rather than the book. The whole sci-fi, post-apocalyptic imagery and ideas was what got me.

And expanding that a little wider, when did you first pick up 2000 AD? I suppose growing up in Australia it was slightly more difficult to get hold of?

ES: I’m now going back through old issues rediscovering a lot of the stories. I have a bunch of old 80’s original issues but being here in Australia it was a challenge to follow as we didn’t always have access to the books. It’s great to see the Complete Case Files of Judge Dredd more recently collected which is a good way to spend a Sunday afternoon with a nice strong coffee.

When did you first start making art and are you professionally trained, or self-taught?

ES: It’s hard to remember but I have always drawn, I found it the easiest way to express myself from a very young age. Commercially I started selling work around age 16 depicting how Christmas displays would look for shopping centres. During school, art was my focus and primary outlet inspired by contemporary artists of the time and the classic masters. I’ve always worked in creative industries however I was mainly self taught until I enrolled and was granted a scholarship at the Julian Ashton Art School in Sydney around 2009.

Can you give us an idea of your background, what you do professionally, where you see your art at the moment?

ES: I’m a traditional artist and digital artist working in the film and entertainment industries. I’ve had the pleasure of working with some of the top directors in the world and creating art on projects such Alien: Covenant, 300, Mad Max: Fury Road, Gods of Egypt and The Chronicles of Narnia. I also paint in traditional media with a focus on narrative and figurative work.

Classifying a particular stage of my art is always difficult- as a creative it is a life long endeavour; ‘Always the student and never the master.’ That said, after 20 years in the entertainment industries I regularly teach workshops in Australia yet also attend workshops internationally when I can to expand on my own education. Your work constantly grows and shifts as you start to narrow down your self-expression, however my commercial digital approach hasn’t changed that much and I often like to focus on the narrative, mood and atmosphere with my pieces.

What influences are there upon your art? I know we’ve already talked about certain comic artists that might have influenced you, but let’s take it far wider…

ES: In addition to those comic artists mentioned already, Dave Gibbons, Cam Kennedy, George Pratt, there’s John Buscema, Mike Mignola and Philippe Druillet. But there are many artists that inspire me from the classics, Rembrandt to Delacroix, to more contemporary artists, such as Zdzisław Beksiński and Phil Hale’s dark, dynamic work. Also the Australian Impressionists and their sense of light and atmosphere have had a massive impact on my work and with most of their art hanging in the Capital cities here in Australia I make regular trips to view it up close.

Finally, what about plans for the future, both 2000 AD and beyond?

ES: I’ve been lucky with opportunities in the film industry, am very grateful and will continue with these projects but I would like to push further into the graphic novel realm with 3 projects that I have on the back burner. I am also very partial to opportunities for cover work on a number of properties that I think my style could suit!

Posted on

2000 AD Art Stars winner announced!

The winner of the latest 2000 AD Art Stars competition has been announced!

Read the 2000 AD blog interview with Ev about his win…

His winning entry will be printed in a future issue of 2000 AD and the next 2000 AD Art Stars theme will be announced shortly! Check out the two runners-up entries below…

Second place: Dan Chase

‘Tharg’s Choice’: Lyndon Webb

Posted on

INTERVIEW: 2000 AD Art Stars winner Mark Montague

Mark Montague is the first winner of the 2000 AD Art Stars contest, the incredible competition giving you the chance to see your art gracing the pages of a future issue of 2000 AD!

Mark’s piece shows Judge Dredd captured and in the clutches of Brother Morgar and the Brotherhood of Darkness, fondly remembered by us all from the ‘Cursed Earth’ saga and will be appearing in a future Prog as a Star Scan.

The Star Scan has been a staple of 2000 AD for many years, with pin-ups over the years from many of the greatest names in 2000 AD and British comics history, including Brian Bolland, Dave Gibbons, Kev O’Neill, Jock, Liam Sharp, and many more.

The second Art Stars theme for winter 2018 is Rogue Trooper, so get your entries in as soon as you can! We’ll be featuring selected entries on 2000 AD’s social media and the very best will be featuring in the Prog!

After finding out about the Art Stars competition, with the inaugural theme of Judge Dredd, how long did it take you to decide on that final image, of Dredd in a passive pose, captured by Brother Morgar and the Brotherhood of Darkness from the Cursed Earth saga?

MARK MONTAGUE: I did several ideas but I decided against a cool pose of Dredd holding a gun or posing on his Lawmaster, because most of the great 2000 AD artists had already done iconic covers like that, so I wanted to try and paint a scene which was telling a story.

Like many readers I was a fan of Brian Bolland’s Eagle covers, which had Dredd in very stressful predicaments but he wasn’t fazed by the situation. The covers of Judge Dredd No.5 and No.32 are perfect examples of this. In the back of the Titan Books ‘Cursed Earth’ collection, Bolland had drawn some posters, which depicted scenes from the story in greater detail or sometimes a scene that didn’t actually take place at all.

I liked Morgar and the Brotherhood of Darkness but always felt that their story was a bit rushed and I always wanted to see more of them, so my picture is a scene that takes place after Bolland’s image for the No.5 US reprint. I still wanted to get a bit of humour into the picture by having Morgar adding a bit of seasoning, to make Dredd a bit more appetising to digest. Also, I had Dredd, looking more miffed than terrified.

Is this your first appearance in the pages of 2000 AD and what does it mean knowing you’ll be seeing your art as a Star Scan?

MM: To have my work published in 2000 AD is a dream come true, though this isn’t the first time for me being published in 2000 AD. From the early to mid 80s I had some of my drawings published in Tharg’s Nerve Centre. I had a ‘Rogue Trooper’, ‘Strontium Hog’, ‘Judge Schwarzenegger’ and a ‘Joe Pineapples’ picture published.

Going back to your earlier days now, when did you first get into comics and how long was it before you picked up your first Prog?

MM: It was around 1978, although it tended to be a bit off and on, mainly due to the fact the newsagent never ordered many copies. So, one week you would get an issue of Starlord but the next week, somebody else had brought the next instalment of Starlord, so you would buy Spectacular Spiderman instead, or whatever was left. My first 2000 AD was Prog 180 with the classic, ‘Judge Child’ story. Even though I had missed most of the previous parts of the story by then, I was hooked from that point on.

Looking back over the history of 2000 AD, what strips or characters are your favourites? And what artists have had the most influence on your ownwork?

MM: Dredd, Rogue Trooper, Button Man, Sláine, Nemesis, Nikolai Dante and The Order. As for artists, Ian Kennedy & Cam Kennedy’s approach to shadows, bounce lighting, aircraft, vehicles and weaponry is something that influences my work. As well the work of Brian Bolland, Mike McMahon, Glenn Fabry, Simon Bisley, Greg Staples, John M Burns and Colin Wilson.

Can you give us some idea of your artistic background? Did you always want to get into comics art or has the process been a more roundabout one?

MM: I’m 48yrs old and I’ve had no formal art training. I did an art foundation course and was disappointed to discover that the tutors weren’t going to teach us anything useful about drawing or painting. It meant that I had to teach myself to get better at art, which is okay but without a mentor, it means that you take a lot longer before you are ready to start working as a professional artist.

I managed to get some work as an animator, then I become a 3D modeller and all these disciplines feed into my 2D work. From 3D modelling I discovered ambient occlusion, sub-surface scattering, bounce lights, fill lights, rim lights and from animation I got the importance of good acting and strong poses that help convey an emotion to an audience.

What comics work have you done already before this Art Stars win?

MM: I did some self-published work which was sold in my local comic shop in the early ’90s. My artistic range ran from humour strips (The Cosmic Sausage) to my arty style, trying to channel my inner Bill Sienkiewicz, for a strip about a person who was unaware that they are a prisoner. I then stopped drawing comics for a while, when I became an animator.

Finally, what’s next for you?

MM: To get a chance to paint some covers for 2000 AD and the Megazine, which hopefully people will like!

For more details about the 2000 AD Art Stars competition and how to enter, visit the 2000 AD website.

Posted on

Which classic 2000 AD character is next for the Art Stars competition?

Our new art competition – 2000 AD Art Stars – is your chance to get into the pages of 2000 AD AND get paid for it!

Star Scans have been a staple of 2000 AD since its earliest days: single-image pin-ups of the greatest characters in the galaxy, drawn by some of the best artists in comics from Brian Bolland and Dave Gibbons to Jock and Liam Sharp!

Every four months, we’re giving artistic Earthlets the chance to submit Star Scan pin-ups based on 2000 AD characters – and the winner, chosen by the editorial team at 2000 AD, will be published in a future edition of the Galaxy’s Greatest Comic. PLUS they’ll be paid for their art! The winner of the first competition, with the theme of Judge Dredd, was Mark Montague!

This is your chance to follow in the footsteps of some of comics’ greatest artistic talents and, who knows, maybe break into the industry yourself!

We’re pleased to announce that the theme for the 2000 AD Art Stars competition for winter 2018 is … Rogue Trooper!

Bred for war, but living for revenge – he is the last of the Genetic Infantrymen … he is Rogue Trooper! After his comrades are wiped out in the devastating Quartz Zone Massacre, Rogue goes on a quest to find the general who betrayed them, carrying the consciousnesses of three of his fallen brothers as biochips implanted into his equipment.

So get your thinking caps on and your drawing equipment ready, and prepare to find out who’ll be the next winner of the 2000 AD Art Stars competition!

Follow the competition as we feature selected entries on 2000 AD’s social media at:

Instagram: instagram.com/2000adartcomp
Facebook: facebook.com/2000adartcomp
Tumblr: 2000ADonline.tumblr.com

For full terms and conditions, visit the competition page on the 2000 AD website…

Posted on 2 Comments

Are you the next 2000 AD Art Star? Enter now!

Some of the biggest artists in comic books got their break at the legendary award-winning 2000 AD – and you could be joining them! Our art competition – 2000 AD Art Stars – is your chance to get into the pages of 2000 AD AND get paid for it!

Star Scans have been a staple of 2000 AD since its earliest days: single-image pin-ups of the greatest characters in the galaxy, from Judge Dredd and Strontium Dog to Dan Dare and Rogue Trooper, drawn by some of the best artists in comics from Brian Bolland and Dave Gibbons to Jock and Liam Sharp!

Every few months, we give artistic Earthlets the chance to submit Star Scan pin-ups based on 2000 AD characters – and the winner, chosen by the editorial team at 2000 AD, will be published in a future edition of the Galaxy’s Greatest Comic. PLUS they’ll be paid for their art!

Check out the previous winners Mark MontagueEv Shipard, Chris Skinner, Dan Chase, Frederico Arevalo, Neil McClements and Uwe De Witt!

After we announce a new theme, would-be art droids can submit their entries and our editor will then choose their favourite image for publication. Plus, two runners-up will be chosen and receive zarjaz 2000 AD graphic novels! This is your chance to follow in the footsteps of some of comics’ greatest artistic talents and, who knows, maybe break into the industry yourself!

Rebellion is pleased to announce the new theme for the 2000 AD Art Stars competition:

ROBO-HUNTER!

THE DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES IS 9PM GMT ON 31 DECEMBER 2020

Follow the competition as we feature selected entries on 2000 AD’s social media at:

Please read the terms and conditions below carefully before submitting!

Terms and Conditions:

  • Entries must be sent by 9pm GMT on date of stated deadline.
  • Entries must be in JPG, TIFF or PNG format – PDF and GIF will not be accepted. Entries must be at 300dpi resolution, a maximum of 3000px wide, and with a maximum file size of 10MB.
  • Entries will be judged by editorial staff at 2000 AD.
  • The judges’ decision is final and we will not enter into discussion regarding entries.
  • Entries that do not fit the theme will not be considered.
  • Entries that include the use of licensed characters from outside of those owned by Rebellion/2000 AD will not be considered.
  • Entries that include nudity or sexualised, racist, sexist, and/or transphobic imagery will not be considered.
  • Entries must not bear any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead – i.e. no celebrity likenesses.
  • A maximum of TWO entries per person will be permitted. In the event of more than two being sent, only the first two will be considered by the judges.
  • The winning entry will be published as a ‘Star Scan’ in a forthcoming edition of 2000 AD, the date to be decided by editorial.
  • In order for their entry to be published in 2000 AD and to receive payment, the winner must sign a standard contract with 2000 AD/Rebellion.
  • Entries may be selected to feature on 2000 AD’s social media accounts with named credit.
  • PLEASE NOTE: WE CANNOT GUARANTEE THAT YOUR ENTRY WILL BE FEATURED ON OUR SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS. 2000 AD Art Stars receives hundreds of entries and we can only share a fraction of them. Those featured are chosen at random. All entries will be shared in a post on Facebook after the closing date.
    • We ask you to understand the following:
      • We cannot share every single entry
      • Being featured/not featured on our social media does not affect your chances of winning
      • Our email and social media accounts are not monitored 24/7
      • We cannot enter into correspondence regarding entries, if there is a problem with your entry then we will contact you
      • Please do not take what we do and do not share personally.
  • Non-winning entries will not be used by 2000 AD and will be deleted from Rebellion’s servers as soon as a winner is chosen (selected images will remain on social media but can be removed upon request). Artwork remains the property of artists but copyright of characters remains with Rebellion.
  • Entries will not be considered from artists currently or having previously worked in the comic book industry, as adjudicated by 2000 AD. This includes any current or previous paid work for a publisher of comic books, either in print or digital. You may be asked to verify your eligability before your entry can be considered.
  • Please respect the droids – spam or aggressive/threatening emails or messages will result in any entry being removed from the competition and the sender banned from future competitions.
  • All characters are ™ Rebellion 2000 AD Ltd, © Rebellion 2000 AD Ltd, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Submit your entry by emailing 2000adartcomp@gmail.com

When emailing your entry, you should receive an automated reply confirming receipt – please check your email provider’s spam folder if it does not arrive within 24 hours.